The Southern Dutchess News - Printers & Publishers
84 East Main Street, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590
office (845) 297-3723

Beacon Free Press
Beacon Free Press This Week...

The Beacon Free Press has been Beacon’s primary center of news and entertainment coverage for over 25 years. Coverage includes local city and school news and features, Dutchess County Legislature, county legal notices, obituaries, plus coverage of arts and entertainment, hospitals and health, education, libraries and local businesses and organizations.


ADVERTISERS: Work together and save money
Click here for the Promotion Flyer


07/16/14 Highlights of this week's edition...


Tribute to Peter & Toshi

By Goldee Greene, Staff Writer/Arts & Entertainment

(Continued from cover) Speakers on the roster include Harry Belafonte and Michael Moore. The Bardavon event is a memorial that will features friends of family of the couple talking about their lives.

Organizer Kitama Jackson, the Seegers’ grandson, expressed enthusiasm. “We’re aiming to cherish the memory of two beautiful human beings by encircling their legacy of peace, social justice and environmental stewardship with the arts of past, present and future generations.”

Variety is key. “We wanted people to have the choice of many different events,” said daughter Tinya Seeer. “So they can select from music, film, photography and square dancing. As a reminder, tickets must be picked up in person for the July 18 memorial service at the Bardavon, due to space limitations.”

“My only hope is that as many people as possible will show up to share these five wonderful days that Toshi and Pete also would’ve enjoyed,” said Connie Hogarth, a longtime Beacon Sloop Club member, whose late husband, Art Kamel, was also a participant. “Toshi was my best friend for many years. I am thankful that the Seeger family has envisioned this five-day tribute. It will be rich with all the creativity and focus not only of past memories and music they created and loved, but looking to the future. Hopefuly, the young people participating will help make the Seeger dreams of peace come true.”

The first couple of Beacon, Pete and Toshi Seeger were known for their environmentalism, particularly the cleaup of the Hudson River, and their love of peace. Toshi died July 9, 2013, at the age of 91. She was remembered as a driving force not only behind Pete’s legendary music career, but also behind the formation of the Sleep Clearwater, the environmental organization that changed the history of the Hudson River.

Pete Seeger, beloved folksinger, activist and environmentalist, died Jan. 27 of this year at age 94. Seeger was known as much for his environmental activism as he was for his socially conscience folk songs. He was a friend of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King and defied Sen. Joseph McCarthy during hearings at the House of Un-American Activities Committee during the so-called Communist witch hunts.

Both were considered great friends of the Hudson Valley and icons throughout the world.

All events are free of charge. Bardavon tickets must be picked up in person. Go to seegerfest.org for dates, times and locations.

Read the full story in this week’s print edition.


Explore the exploration vessels

Detailed replicas of Columbus’ ships to dock in Newburgh

By Ray Fashona


Replicas of the Nina and the Pinta will pull into Newburgh’s waterfront this weekend. Tours of the ships will be offered.
- Courtesy photo

NEWBURGH – Imagine sailing uncharted seas more 500 years ago, making a voyage fraught with danger – both known and unknown.

Visitors can get a small taste of what it might have been like when two replica ships, the Nina and the Pinta, pull into Newburgh’s waterfront this weekend. Tours of the ships, as historically correct as if Columbus was still leading them to the New World, will be offered July 18-20 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Stephen Sanger, who has captained the Nina for six years, said the ships, built by the Columbus Foundation, are really floating museums. The Nina, he noted, was built entirely without power tools. Before a board was planed or a nail driven, three years of research went into making the ship as historically accurate as possible, Sanger said.

The actual construction began in 1988 and the ship was completed in 1992. The Nina is a detailed reconstruction of a caravel, a type of ship used by explorers in the Age of Discovery. In 2005, the Pinta was added to accompany the Nina on its voyages.

Sanger said the Santa Maria, a ship Columbus never liked, ran aground on Christmas Eve 1492 on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. The Santa Maria, a cargo vessel, was considerably larger than the two caravel ships.

The Pinta, although an authentic replica, is larger than the original, 15 feet longer and eight feet wider, to accommodate more visitors.

The ships are so true to the originals that they are steered by tillers. According to Sanger, ship’s wheels were not used until the early 1700s. Steering by tiller can be difficult, Sanger acknowledged, “especially in rough seas.” But, unlike Columbus’ ships, the new Nina and Pinta are rarely in the ocean for long stretches of time.

For almost 11 months of the year, the ships travel the Gulf Coast, the East Coast, the Great Lakes and the Midwestern river system. After their stop in Newburgh, the Nina and Pinta are headed for the Great Lakes, Sanger said.

The ships have been to Newburgh before, according to Mayor Judy Kennedy, most recently two years ago. She said the docking of the ships “has been a great educational opportunity for kids.”

It is also a boost to the city’s tourism. Kennedy said Newburgh’s revitalized waterfront normally draws large crowds in the summer, but when the Columbus ships arrive “you can double it.”

She said the ships bring people to Newburgh from throughout the region. “It’s a great historical experience,” she added.

Also over the weekend, the Newburgh Riverfront Marina will he holding a memorial for the HMS Bounty replica. According to volunteer Jim Williams, who helped organize the event, the Bounty replica visited Newburgh twice, in 2010 and 2012. The ship sank off the coast of North Carolina in October of 2012. The captain and one crew member died in the accident.

Williams said the Bounty replica crew “had become our friends” during their visits to Newburgh, and the Marina group decided to honor them with a monument on the waterfront. The monument will be dedicated Saturday, July 19 at 1 p.m.

The Bounty replica was commissioned by MGM for the 1962 film “Mutiny on the Bounty.”

At 2 p.m. Saturday, Williams said, the U.S. Coast Guard will demonstrate an air-sea rescue.

Sanger said one of the things visitors learn during a tour of the Nina and Pinta is that all crew members remained on deck during the entire voyage. Below deck was reserved for livestock and other provisions. Interestingly, crew members slept right on the deck. It was not until they saw Native Americans sleeping in hammocks that they borrowed the idea and put hammocks on the ships, Sanger said.

Most of the crew members were very young, Sanger said, between 14 and 19. The cabin boy, basically a servant who waited on the ship’s officers, could be as young as 8.

Sanger said the journey was a perilous one, with many of the crew expecting the ships to fall off the edge of the earth. He said there was a mutiny partway through the voyage which Columbus was able to quell.

According to its web site, “The Columbus Foundation’s aim is to educate the public on the type of ship, the ‘caravel.’ that Columbus used to discover a New World in the year 1492. Columbus made four voyages totaling 12 years on ships like these.”

Cost for a self-guided tour of the ships is $8, $7 for senior citizens, $6 for students ages 5 to 16. Children 4 and younger are free.

Teachers or organizations that want to schedule a 30-minute guided tour should call 1-787-672-2152 or e-mail columfnd1492@gmail.com. A guided tour requires a minimum of 15 people.

For more about the Nina and Pinta, visit www.thenina.com


Also in the July 16-22, 2014 issue:

  • Organization brings veterans to D.C. to visit memorial


Brian Maher and Becky Boone, center, cut the ribbon during a ceremony at the Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce. - Photo courtesy of DCRCC


 

Contact Information

News, letters to the editor and calendar items:  EMAIL

Arts & Entertainment:
 EMAIL

Call 845-297-3723